Katz’s, the Kings of Pastrami

Do you want to eat at Katz’s when you visit New York? Oh, yes—yes, you do.

From The New York Times:

Katz’s has become a survivor in a neighborhood that had long-established delis. It began 125 years ago under a different name, Iceland Brothers. They took in the first Katz, Willy, as a partner in the early years of the 20th century. Eventually, he bought out the brothers and changed the name from Iceland & Katz to Katz’s. Read more

The front of Katz's Deli on Houston Street.

The Empire State Building, from every angle

Whether you’re stuck outside the city or you live here but are daunted by the hordes of tourists, the Empire State Building remains a marvel for the ages. Time Out New York apparently agrees, as they’ve devoted an entertaining and informative slideshow to images of the Art Deco wonder.

We recommend you follow the above link and give it a look.

King Kong atop the ESB

A weekend getaway

Michael ArenellaOrchestra leader, singer, and fashion plate Michael Arenella has a thing for the past.

Arenella plays the music of the 1920s and the ’30s and wears clothes and drives cars that match.

A poster for the Jazz Age Lawn PartyThis weekend, he and his Dreamland Orchestra will again be featured at the annual Jazz Age Lawn Party on Governors Island, an event he founded some years ago. It takes place on both Saturday and Sunday.

If you’re within striking distance of New York City, you should it make it a point to be in attendance. The forecast calls for lovely weather, relatively speaking, the music will have you tapping your toes, at the very least, and you’ll be surrounded by hundreds of folks in vintage finery. (If you own no vintage finery, you might be advised to ask yourself why not, but don’t let that prevent you from attending the lawn party. Why, there will even been vintage clothing dealers on the premises, so you can kill two birds with one stone.)

This video was directed and edited by our friend Andrew Yamato.

Anyone hungry?

There’s no denying New York’s an expensive town to visit, and sampling the amazing array of cuisines offered at the city’s seemingly endless roster of eateries can take a big bite out of one’s travel budget.

That’s why Restaurant Week, which happens a couple of times a year (and has long since stopped limiting itself to a mere seven days), is considered cause for celebration by both New Yorkers and those savoring a sojourn in the city. It’s a terrific opportunity to patronize some of the spots that might otherwise be out of one’s price range.

From January 16 though February 10 (Monday through Friday only), foodies all over town will be out savoring the culinary offerings of many of the city’s most celebrated restaurants.

But don’t dally, if you wish to join them—reservations go fast. Book yours now for the participating dining spot of your choice.

All aboard the Nostalgia Train!

Great news! A grand NYC holiday tradition is again renewed as the Nostalgia Train makes its weekly runs once again.

Vintage Semdac advertisementGoldenberg's Peanut Chews advertisementVintage Berkeley Blades advertisementVintage Alka-Seltzer advertisementVintage Burma-Shave advertisementVintage Postum advertisementExterior of vintage subway carInterior of vintage subway carInterior of vintage subway carInterior of vintage subway carVintage subway seatsVintage WNYC-AM advertisementVintage hat advertisementVintage Subway Sun panelVintage Subway Sun panelVintage Subway Sun panelVintage Subway Sun panelVintage Subway Sun panelCelebrate Citizenship DayVintage Subway Sun panelHelpful Hints panelVintage Subway Sun panel
View the Slideshow

What’s the Nostalgia Train, you ask?

Every holiday season in recent years, the good folks at the NYC transit have run the Nostalgia Train, which is made up of subway cars that operated from the 1930s to the 1970s. Not only do train fans and nostalgia buffs get to experience subway cars from another era, but all the ads that line the upper walls of the cars are vintage ones, ranging from the 1930s through the 1960s.

Our first experience with the Nostalgia Train came some years back, on a special express run from midtown to Coney Island on a hot summer day, but it’s even more fun at holiday time.

The train runs on Sundays from 10 a.m. till 5 p.m., November 28 thru December 26, making the same stops as the M train, traveling from the 2nd Avenue station on the Lower East Side to Queens Plaza and back again.

You can catch a ride on these classic R1/9 subway cars at stations along the weekday M Line icon line between Queens Plaza and 2 Av. You can board the train at these stations:

Queens Plaza

• Court Sq-23 St

• Lexington Av/53 St

• 5 Av/53 St

• 47-50 Sts/Rockefeller Center

• 42 St Bryant Park

• 34 St Herald Sq

• 23 St (6 Av)

• 14 St (6 Av)

• W 4 St Wash Sq

• B’way-Lafayette St

• 2 Av

Departures from 2nd Avenue are at: 9:58 a.m., 11:27 a.m., 12:57 p.m., 2:27 p.m., and 3:57 p.m..

Departures from Queens Plaza are at: 10:43 a.m., 12:13 p.m., 1:42 p.m., 3:13 p.m., and 4:43 p.m..

In the past, we’ve donned vintage clothing when riding the nostalgia train, and in a perfect world, everyone else would do the same—think how it would heighten the experience! But if you’re in from out of town and left your vintage wear at home, don’t let that stop you from enjoying this little bit of time travel.

The photos in the slideshow are from a ride we took in December 2008. They’ll give you an idea, we hope, of what a delightful experience the Nostalgia Train is.

Pass the stuffing, please

Planning a trip to NYC for Thanksgiving? Man cannot live on floats and giant balloons alone. You’re going to want some turkey and perhaps even some pumpkin pie, no? Don’t fret—the indispensable Manhattan’s User Guide has compiled an extensive list of eateries that will be serving on Thanksgiving; there’s bound to be one near you.

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