New York City: Appreciating Its Most Precious Resources

New Yorkers have been distressed in recent years (and with good reason) over the many venerable (and still viable) shops, restaurants and taverns that have had to close—not because their business had dropped off, but merely because their landlord had doubled, tripled, even quadrupled their rent. It’s an issue many residents of New York City care deeply about, as more and more chain stores and restaurants move into the city. The very nature of the town we love seems to be changing, and not for the better.

But it’s good sometimes to stop and remember that all is not lost—that we still have many unique establishments that offer a quirky character all their own. Here’s a Buzzfeed list any New Yorker (and even more so, any tourist) should have handy as he make their way around the Big Apple.

44 Amazing NYC Places That Actually Still Exist

New York City: Russ and Daughters storefront

Christmas in NYC Tour Returns for 2015!

Hey New Yorkers, if you have holiday guests arriving in the coming weeks, you may well find yourself scrambling for activities to keep them occupied. Why stress? Let Avenues and Alleys take over. Treat your guests to our Christmas in NYC walking tour!

Christmas in NYC: Macy's on 34th StreetOur Christmas in NYC Tour is a 90-minute walk during which we visit the sites and share the stories that have made New York City the Christmas Capitol of America. This midtown tour includes a look at Macy’s, the Empire State Building, Rockefeller Center‘s legendary Christmas tree, St. Patrick’s Cathedral and a string of gorgeous holiday window displays at such iconic establishments as Lord & Taylor, Saks Fifth Avenue, Tiffany and Co., and Bergdorf Goodman. We’ll also discuss New York’s iconic contributions to the holidays as they’re celebrated today, including the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, the Radio City Music Hall Christmas Spectacular, and even Santa Claus himself.

This seasonal tour is available for booking from Friday, November 27, through Friday, January 1, on the following schedule: Monday-Friday: 9 a.m., 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday: 12pm, 3pm, and 6pm. Contact us at info@avenuesandalleys.com to make arrangements.

The fee for the tour is $60 for up to four guests. Additional guests may be included at $10 per person.

If the above times don’t fit your guests’ schedule, other times might be available. Please contact us, and we will do our best to accommodate you.

We can’t wait to show you the town!

Katz’s, the Kings of Pastrami

Do you want to eat at Katz’s when you visit New York? Oh, yes—yes, you do.

From The New York Times:

Katz’s has become a survivor in a neighborhood that had long-established delis. It began 125 years ago under a different name, Iceland Brothers. They took in the first Katz, Willy, as a partner in the early years of the 20th century. Eventually, he bought out the brothers and changed the name from Iceland & Katz to Katz’s. Read more

The front of Katz's Deli on Houston Street.

The Empire State Building, from every angle

Whether you’re stuck outside the city or you live here but are daunted by the hordes of tourists, the Empire State Building remains a marvel for the ages. Time Out New York apparently agrees, as they’ve devoted an entertaining and informative slideshow to images of the Art Deco wonder.

We recommend you follow the above link and give it a look.

King Kong atop the ESB

A weekend getaway

Michael ArenellaOrchestra leader, singer, and fashion plate Michael Arenella has a thing for the past.

Arenella plays the music of the 1920s and the ’30s and wears clothes and drives cars that match.

A poster for the Jazz Age Lawn PartyThis weekend, he and his Dreamland Orchestra will again be featured at the annual Jazz Age Lawn Party on Governors Island, an event he founded some years ago. It takes place on both Saturday and Sunday.

If you’re within striking distance of New York City, you should it make it a point to be in attendance. The forecast calls for lovely weather, relatively speaking, the music will have you tapping your toes, at the very least, and you’ll be surrounded by hundreds of folks in vintage finery. (If you own no vintage finery, you might be advised to ask yourself why not, but don’t let that prevent you from attending the lawn party. Why, there will even been vintage clothing dealers on the premises, so you can kill two birds with one stone.)

This video was directed and edited by our friend Andrew Yamato.

NYC as it was

Frank Oscar Larson (1896-1964) was born in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, of Swedish immigrant parents and lived in Flushing, Queens most of his life. As an adult, Larson spent his days at a branch of the Empire Trust Company (now Bank of New York Mellon), working his way up through the ranks from auditor to vice-president, and spare time on weekends taking photographs of street life throughout New York City.

He was an accomplished photographer who eloquently documented 1950s Chinatown, the Bowery, Hell’s Kitchen, City Island, Times Square, Central Park, and much more.

This exhibition is compiled from thousands of negatives recently discovered stored away in his daughter-in-law’s house in Maine in 2009. Soren Larson, his grandson and a television news camera man and producer, has been scanning and printing the 55-year-old images found stored in over 100 envelopes filled with mostly medium format, 2-1/4 x 2-1/4″ negatives, and neatly noted by location and date in Larson’s own hand.

Frank Oscar Larson: 1950s New York Street Stories is on view at the queensmuseum.org through May 20, 2012.


The above text is from queensmuseum.org